Dec. 2 (Bloomberg) — Japan’s domestic shipments of solar cells and modules rose more than threefold in the fiscal second quarter amid a push to expand energy supplies.

Local shipments totaled 2,075 megawatts in the three months ended Sept. 30, compared with 627 megawatts in the same quarter last year, according to a statement from the Japan Photovoltaic Energy Association today. Exports fell to 53 megawatts from 153 megawatts a year ago.

Japanese suppliers accounted for 72 percent of all modules shipped in Japan, including 628 megawatts produced at plants outside the country, the association said.

Domestic shipments have been robust. Japan shipped 3,729 megawatts for the six months to Sept. 30, according to the group. That compared with 3,809 megawatts shipped during the entire last fiscal year.

Japan started offering above-market rates for clean energy, including solar and geothermal, after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident.

The data was compiled from 41 companies including Sharp Corp. and Kyocera Corp.

Shares of Sharp, the Osaka-based electronics maker whose solar business posted a profit in the second quarter after almost doubling sales volumes, rose as much as 3 percent to 345 yen after the association’s release. The shares were at 342 yen as of 1:45 p.m. Japan time.

To contact the reporter on this story: Chisaki Watanabe in Tokyo at cwatanabe5@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net